Resumen sobre el desayuno nacional de oración de Esperanza. 1


A continuación encontrarán, en inglés, un resume del desayuno nacional de oración de Esperanza.

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WASHINGTON, June 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Esperanza, the largest Hispanic faith-based Evangelical network in the United States, committed to strengthening the Latino community, announced that President Barack H. Obama will be the keynote speaker at the 2009 National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast this Friday, June 19 at the J.W. Marriott Hotel in Washington, D.C. President Obama will address the Hispanic community and share his thoughts and plans on how to address the issues that gravely affect Latinos in the United States.
Esperanza is proud to welcome The Honorable Janet Napolitano, Secretary of Homeland Security, who will be speaking during the Prayer Breakfast, as well. Secretary Napolitano has an extensive background in homeland security. She is fiercely and fearlessly committed to our country’s safety, being one of the first to implement state homeland security strategies in the nation. She has also been instrumental and vocal in the fight for comprehensive immigration reform.
Governor Edward G. Rendell (D-PA) will be receiving the Esperanza Leadership Award based on the bible verse Joshua 1:9, for his exemplary leadership. Maria Ruiz, who was named a CNN Hero and given an award with the same title, will now be receiving the Mujeres de Esperanza Certain Woman Award for uplifting other women through service; for her compassionate and selfless work providing aid and resources to those stricken by poverty and violence in the city of Juarez, Mexico.
The program will also feature musical performances from major Hispanic Gospel artists, such as Latin Grammy Award winner, Marcos Witt; ARPA Award winner, Julissa; Alex Campos; Ingrid Rosario; Ordained Praise; and Christian trumpet artist, David O’Neill.
“The Hispanic Faith community is delighted to receive our president at this year’s Prayer Breakfast,” said the Rev. Luis Cortes, Jr. “We are anxious to take notice of the issues he feels are the most salient for our community. We are encouraged by his caring for the plight of the Latino community and for fighting for Latino Civil Rights.”
The 2009 National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference has gathered over 750 Hispanic clergy members of different denominations and leaders of community based organizations, representing a broad spectrum of the national Latino community.

The Reverend Luis Cortes, Jr. is president of Esperanza, the largest Hispanic faith-based Evangelical network in the United Sates. With a national network of more than 12,000 churches, ministries, and community organizations, Esperanza is one of the leading voices for Hispanics in America. For more information, go to www.esperanza.us.

—————————-

THE WHITE HOUSE

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT
AT THE ESPERANZA NATIONAL HISPANIC PRAYER BREAKFAST

J.W. Marriott
Washington, D.C.
9:32 A.M. EDT
THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. Buenos días.
AUDIENCE: Buenos días.
THE PRESIDENT: It is good to see everybody here. Just a few quick acknowledgments. Our outstanding Secretary of Department of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano, is here. Please give her a big round of applause. (Applause.) The great governor of the state of Pennsylvania, Ed Rendell. (Applause.) Two special members of my staff that I want all of you to get to know. First of all, we have a White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships — if you haven’t already met him, Joshua DeBois is just a wonderful young man, please give him a big round of applause; he helps to organize a lot of our faith outreach. (Applause.) And our director of Intergovernmental Affairs, one of my favorite people, Cecilia Muñoz, please give her a big round of applause. (Applause.)
I want to thank Reverend Cortes for the wonderful introduction and the wonderful prayer for me and my family. I want to thank Esperanza, and all of you who worked so hard to put together the National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference. And I also want to join you in honoring the work of Adolfo Carrion Sr. on this Father’s Day weekend — (applause) — on this Father’s Day weekend I know that my director of Urban Affairs, Adolfo’s son, is particularly proud of his dad. I also want to thank all of you for the work that you do each and every day. Through your service to your communities, you represent the very best in our country. And I’m honored to join you in prayer this morning.
At a time when there’s no shortage of challenges to occupy our time, it’s even more important to step back, and to give thanks, and to seek guidance from each other — but most importantly, from God. That’s what we’ve come here to do.
We can begin by giving thanks for the legacy that allows us to come together. For it was the genius of America’s Founders to protect the freedom of all religion, and those who practice no religion at all. So as we join in prayer, we remember that this is a nation of Christians and Muslims and Jews and Hindus and non-believers. It is this freedom that allows faith to flourish within our borders. It is this freedom that makes our nation stronger.
For those of us who draw on faith as a guiding force in our lives, prayer has many purposes. For many, it is a source of support when times are hard. President Lincoln, who Reverend Cortes mentioned, once said, “I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.” And while the challenges that I’ve faced pale in comparison to Lincoln’s, I know that more than once I’ve been filled with the same conviction over the last five months.
But prayer is more than a last resort. Prayer helps us search for meaning in our own lives, and it helps us find the vision and the strength to see the world that we want to build. And that’s what I’d like to talk about for just a few minutes today.
As I look out at this audience, I’m reminded of the power of faith in America — faith in God, and a faith in the promise of this great country. Each of us come from many different places. We trace our roots back to different nations, and we represent a broad spectrum of personal and political beliefs. But all of us pray to God. All of us share a determination to build a better future for our children and grandchildren. And that must be a starting point for common ground, and for the America that we want to build.
Like some of you, I am the son of a parent who came to these shores in search of a better future. And while I may be the first African American President, there is nothing unique or unusual about the opportunities that this country gave to me. Instead, like generations of Americans, I could count on the basic promise that no matter what you look like, or where you come from, America will let you go as far as your dreams and your hard work will carry you.
And that promise is at the heart of the American story. It’s a story shared by many of you — by clergy and members of Congress; by business leaders and community organizers. It’s the story of every young child who has the opportunity to go farther in life than their parents were able to go. It’s the story of a young girl who could rise from a public housing project to be nominated for the highest court in the land. (Applause.) And I am confident that it’s a story that will someday be told by the first Hispanic President of the United States of America. (Applause.)
But we know there is much more work to be done to extend the promise of a better life to all our children and grandchildren. In all that we do, we must be guided by that simple command that binds all great religions together: Love thy neighbor as thyself.
In the 21st century, we’ve learned that this truth is central not just to our own lives, but to our success as a nation. If our children cannot get the world-class education they need to succeed, then America will not be able to compete with other countries. If our families cannot afford health care, then the costs go up for all of us — individuals, businesses, and government. If folks down the street can’t pay their mortgage and folks across town can’t find a job, then that pain is going to trickle into other parts of our economy.
And that’s why we’ve come together on behalf of the future that we want to build — one where all of our children go to the best schools, all our people can go to work and make a living, all our families can afford health care; and prosperity is extended to everybody. Together, we must build a future where the promise of America is kept for a new generation.
We also know that keeping this promise means upholding America’s tradition as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants. Those things aren’t contradictory; they’re complementary. That’s why I’m committed to passing comprehensive immigration reform as President of the United States. (Applause.)
The American people — the American people believe in immigration, but they also believe that we can’t tolerate a situation where people come to the United States in violation of the law, nor can we tolerate employers who exploit undocumented workers in order to drive down wages. That’s why we’re taking steps to strengthen border security, and we must build on those efforts. We must also clarify the status of millions who are here illegally, many who have put down roots. For those who wish to become citizens, we should require them to pay a penalty and pay taxes, learn English, go to the back of the line behind those who played by the rules. That is the fair, practical, and promising way forward, and that’s what I’m committed to passing as President of the United States. (Applause.)
We must never forget that time and again, the promise of America has been renewed by immigrants who make their story part of the American story. We see it in every state of our country. We see it in our families and in our neighborhoods. As President, I’ve been honored to see it demonstrated by the men and women who wear the uniform of the United States.
Last month, I had the honor of welcoming a group of our service members as citizens for the very first time. In that crowd, there were faces from every corner of the world. And one man from Nicaragua — Jeonathan Zapata — had waited his whole life to serve our country even though he was not yet a citizen. “By serving in the military,” he said, “I can also give back to the United States.” He’s done so in Afghanistan, and he even helped man the 400,000th aircraft landing aboard the USS Kitty Hawk.
And Jeonathan’s story is not unique either. He’s part of a proud legacy of service. For generations, Hispanic Americans have served with great commitment and valor, and there are now nearly 150,000 Hispanic Americans serving under our flag. And today we are proud — (applause) — today we are proud to welcome several of them who are wounded warriors recovering at Walter Reed. Please join me in honoring their service, and in keeping them and all of our troops in our thoughts and prayers — please. (Applause.)
These troops have dedicated their lives to serving their fellow Americans. Their example — like those of all of our men and women in uniform — should challenge us to ask what we can do to better serve our communities and our country, because the greatest responsibility that we have as citizens is to one another.
That’s the spirit we need to build; that’s the America that we seek. And to do so, we must look past our divisions to serve the hopes and dreams that we hold in common. We must give life to that fundamental belief that I am my brother’s keeper, that I am my sister’s keeper.
Scripture tells us, “The word is very near to you. It is in your mouth and in your heart so you may obey it.” Today, let us pray for the strength to find the word in our hearts, and for the vision to see the America that we can build together as one nation, and as one people.
Thank you for your partnership. Thank you for your prayers. May God bless all of you, and may God bless the United States of America. (Applause.)
END
9:44 A.M. EDT

________________________________________

June 19, 2009
EDITORIAL

Immigration: It’s Time

President Obama keeps saying he is serious about fixing immigration. You can expect him to say it again at the National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast in Washington on Friday morning. He will likely say it again next week, if his twice-postponed meeting with Congressional leaders to discuss immigration reform finally takes place.
This profusion of promises has not led to any results. Inaction and the passing of time have only increased the frustration of those who have been counting on Mr. Obama to deliver something on immigration reform — a plan, a timetable, the outlines of a bill.
Mr. Obama needs to break the stalemate on immigration. And he needs to do it soon.
He owes it to the Hispanic voters whose overwhelming support helped push him into the White House, and to the undocumented immigrants whose lives have been made miserable under a cruel, ill-conceived enforcement crusade that was concocted in the last administration and survives into this one.
The president can’t do it alone. Democrats in Congress, especially in the House, need to stop being bullied by anti-immigrant bullies. They need to be joined by moderate Republicans, most importantly by Senator John McCain, who must once again defy his party’s zealots to support sensible immigration reform.
Of the many messes President George W. Bush left behind, the failure to fix immigration is one of the few he ever expressed any regret about. There is a lot to regret.
There was wide agreement — in the country and in Washington — on the elements of sensible, comprehensive reform: tighter border and workplace enforcement; a path to assimilation instead of deportation for 12 million illegal immigrants; and an improved future flow of workers and families. It all fell apart in the heat of right-wing politics.
Now it’s Mr. Obama’s turn to lead the country to a different result. No one is expecting a huge bill to pass in a matter of weeks or even months. But there are things he can do right now that will underscore his seriousness.
It boils down to a simple question: If you accept legalization for the undocumented as desirable and inevitable, then why continue to put them through hell?
As they wait for a legalization bill, they are suffering under unjust laws, corrupt policing and a detention and deportation system that routinely suppresses their rights. American citizens who are Hispanic, and are all too frequently victims of racially-driven sweeps, are also suffering. Mr. Obama and his Homeland Security secretary, Janet Napolitano, must do much more to curb those excesses.
Republicans must also do their part. Will they knuckle under once again to the anti-amnesty posses, the Minutemen and nativist dead-enders? Or will they help revive and pass a realistic and desperately needed reform — teaming up with an engaged president and a re-energized John McCain?
The American people have been far out front of the politicians on this issue, overwhelmingly supporting comprehensive reform. Washington can still catch up. There’s still time. And the country is waiting.

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Obama Calls for U.S. Immigration Reform

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference, in Washington on June 19, 2009.
U.S. President Barack Obama says he is committed to passing comprehensive reform of the country’s immigration laws. The president told a gathering of Hispanics the nation’s borders must be strengthened to stop illegal immigration.

Obama said that while immigration is vital for America’s future, illegal immigration cannot continue. “The American people believe in immigration,” he said. “But they also believe that we cannot tolerate a situation where people come to the United States in violation of the law.”

At the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference, Obama said the millions of people who are in the U.S. illegally should have the chance to become citizens. “For those who wish to become citizens, we should require them to pay a penalty and pay taxes, learn English, go to the back of the line behind those who played by the rules. That is the fair, practical and promising way forward,” he said.

The president did not give a timetable for getting immigration reform legislation passed, but he said his administration has made progress in strengthening border security. He also said employers should not be allowed to exploit illegal immigrants to drive down wages.

Obama, the first African-American U.S. president, predicted that someday there will be a Hispanic president.

—————————

Obama Reiterates Commitment to Immigration Reform

By Scott Wilson
President Obama told a Hispanic prayer breakfast today that he is committed to passing “comprehensive immigration reform,” although he did not give the audience a timeline for doing so.

Hispanics supported Obama by a wide margin in the last election, and many of their leaders have grown impatient waiting for a president busy with the economic crisis to move on their agenda.

Their primary interest is immigration reform, a politically complex initiative that involves economics, race and America’s history as a nation of immigrants, which Obama invoked today at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast at the J.W. Marriott Hotel.
In remarks, Obama reiterated his position that reform should include tighter border control and a path for millions of undocumented immigrants to achieve legal status and citizenship, if they choose.
“For those who wish to become citizens, we should require them to pay a penalty and pay taxes, learn English, go to the back of the line behind those who played by the rules,” Obama said. “That is the fair, practical, and promising way forward.”

He did not say whether he would seek legislation this year, as Hispanic leaders have urged him to do. Administration officials have said it may be possible to push for immigration reform this fall after Congress finishes work on health care and energy legislation.
Posted at 12:34 PM ET on Jun 19, 2009  | Category:  Barack Obama

———————–

June 19, 2009 9:59 AM

Obama Promises Immigration Reform

Posted by Stephanie Condon

(CBS)
President Obama this morning told a Hispanic audience that he remains committed to comprehensive immigration reform and upholding “America’s tradition of a nation of laws and a nation of immigration.”

“Those things aren’t contradictory, they’re complementary,” Mr. Obama said at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast. “That’s why I’m committed to passing comprehensive immigration reform.”

He said the United States should strengthen its border security and also “clarify the status of miillions who are here illegally.”

Those who wish to become citizens should be required to pay a penalty, learn English, and get to the back of the line behind those who came here by the rules, he said.

“We must never forget the promise of America has been renewed by immigrants who make their story part of the American story,” Mr. Obama said.

The president began his remarks by greeting the audience with “buenas dias,” and praising the “genius” of America’s founders for protecting the freedom of religion.

“As I look out on this audience, I’m reminded of the power of faith in America,” he said. “Faith in God and… in this great country.”

He said he and and his Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor have benefitted from the opportunities afforded in the United States.

“While I may be the first African-American president, there’s nothing unique about the opportunities this country gave to me,” he said. “It’s the story of a young girl who could rise from a housing project to be nominated to the highest court in the land. I am confident it’s a story that will some day be told by the first Hispanic president.”

———————-

Obama: Bible’s guidance is timely

AP foreign, Friday June 19 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) President Barack Obama says the biblical command to “love thy neighbor as thyself” is as pertinent now as ever.
The president said Friday that an entire community suffers when some members cannot pay their mortgages or find jobs. He called on Americans to work together to build a better future for everyone, including immigrants.
Obama made his remarks at the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference in Washington.
————

Obama: Immigration overhaul should include way for illegal immigrants to become US citizens

Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP
By Associated Press
12:56 PM PDT, June 19, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Friday he is committed to a comprehensive immigration overhaul that includes a way for illegal immigrants to become U.S. citizens.

Obama is hosting a small group of senators and House members at the White House next Thursday to discuss how to move the stalled issue forward, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said. People who disagree with the president’s positions on immigration reform are among those being invited, he said.

“We know the votes aren’t there right now,” Gibbs said, adding that one way to try to change that is to talk about legislative approaches different from previous proposals.

Obama told the Esperanza National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference that U.S. borders must be strengthened to thwart illegal immigration. But he also supports giving the millions of people now in the U.S. illegally the chance to become citizens.

He said they must pay a fine and taxes, learn English and “go to the back of the line” of people trying to enter the United States from their home country.
“That is the fair, practical, and promising way forward, and that’s what I’m committed to passing as president of the United States,” Obama said.

He added: “The American people believe in immigration, but they also believe that we can’t tolerate a situation where people come to the United States in violation of the law, nor can we tolerate employers who exploit undocumented workers in order to drive down wages.”

__________________

The scoop from Washington
Obama on immigration: “We must also clarify the status of millions who are here illegally”

By Lynn Sweet
on June 19, 2009 10:05 AM
THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary
___________________________________________________________
For Immediate Release June 19, 2009

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT
AT THE ESPERANZA NATIONAL HISPANIC PRAYER BREAKFAST

J.W. Marriott
Washington, D.C.

9:32 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. Buenos días.

AUDIENCE: Buenos días.

THE PRESIDENT: It is good to see everybody here. Just a few quick acknowledgments. Our outstanding Secretary of Department of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano, is here. Please give her a big round of applause. (Applause.) The great governor of the state of Pennsylvania, Ed Rendell. (Applause.) Two special members of my staff that I want all of you to get to know. First of all, we have a White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships — if you haven’t already met him, Joshua DeBois is just a wonderful young man, please give him a big round of applause; he helps to organize a lot of our faith outreach. (Applause.) And our director of Intergovernmental Affairs, one of my favorite people, Cecilia Muñoz, please give her a big round of applause. (Applause.)

I want to thank Reverend Cortes for the wonderful introduction and the wonderful prayer for me and my family. I want to thank Esperanza, and all of you who worked so hard to put together the National Hispanic Prayer Breakfast and Conference. And I also want to join you in honoring the work of Adolfo Carrion Sr. on this Father’s Day weekend — (applause) — on this Father’s Day weekend I know that my director of Urban Affairs, Adolfo’s son, is particularly proud of his dad. I also want to thank all of you for the work that you do each and every day. Through your service to your communities, you represent the very best in our country. And I’m honored to join you in prayer this morning.
At a time when there’s no shortage of challenges to occupy our time, it’s even more important to step back, and to give thanks, and to seek guidance from each other — but most importantly, from God. That’s what we’ve come here to do.

We can begin by giving thanks for the legacy that allows us to come together. For it was the genius of America’s Founders to protect the freedom of all religion, and those who practice no religion at all. So as we join in prayer, we remember that this is a nation of Christians and Muslims and Jews and Hindus and non-believers. It is this freedom that allows faith to flourish within our borders. It is this freedom that makes our nation stronger.

For those of us who draw on faith as a guiding force in our lives, prayer has many purposes. For many, it is a source of support when times are hard. President Lincoln, who Reverend Cortes mentioned, once said, “I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.” And while the challenges that I’ve faced pale in comparison to Lincoln’s, I know that more than once I’ve been filled with the same conviction over the last five months.

But prayer is more than a last resort. Prayer helps us search for meaning in our own lives, and it helps us find the vision and the strength to see the world that we want to build. And that’s what I’d like to talk about for just a few minutes today.

As I look out at this audience, I’m reminded of the power of faith in America — faith in God, and a faith in the promise of this great country. Each of us come from many different places. We trace our roots back to different nations, and we represent a broad spectrum of personal and political beliefs. But all of us pray to God. All of us share a determination to build a better future for our children and grandchildren. And that must be a starting point for common ground, and for the America that we want to build.

Like some of you, I am the son of a parent who came to these shores in search of a better future. And while I may be the first African American President, there is nothing unique or unusual about the opportunities that this country gave to me. Instead, like generations of Americans, I could count on the basic promise that no matter what you look like, or where you come from, America will let you go as far as your dreams and your hard work will carry you.

And that promise is at the heart of the American story. It’s a story shared by many of you — by clergy and members of Congress; by business leaders and community organizers. It’s the story of every young child who has the opportunity to go farther in life than their parents were able to go. It’s the story of a young girl who could rise from a public housing project to be nominated for the highest court in the land. (Applause.) And I am confident that it’s a story that will someday be told by the first Hispanic President of the United States of America. (Applause.)

But we know there is much more work to be done to extend the promise of a better life to all our children and grandchildren. In all that we do, we must be guided by that simple command that binds all great religions together: Love thy neighbor as thyself.

In the 21st century, we’ve learned that this truth is central not just to our own lives, but to our success as a nation. If our children cannot get the world-class education they need to succeed, then America will not be able to compete with other countries. If our families cannot afford health care, then the costs go up for all of us — individuals, businesses, and government. If folks down the street can’t pay their mortgage and folks across town can’t find a job, then that pain is going to trickle into other parts of our economy.
And that’s why we’ve come together on behalf of the future that we want to build — one where all of our children go to the best schools, all our people can go to work and make a living, all our families can afford health care; and prosperity is extended to everybody. Together, we must build a future where the promise of America is kept for a new generation.
We also know that keeping this promise means upholding America’s tradition as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants. Those things aren’t contradictory; they’re complementary. That’s why I’m committed to passing comprehensive immigration reform as President of the United States. (Applause.)
The American people — the American people believe in immigration, but they also believe that we can’t tolerate a situation where people come to the United States in violation of the law, nor can we tolerate employers who exploit undocumented workers in order to drive down wages. That’s why we’re taking steps to strengthen border security, and we must build on those efforts. We must also clarify the status of millions who are here illegally, many who have put down roots. For those who wish to become citizens, we should require them to pay a penalty and pay taxes, learn English, go to the back of the line behind those who played by the rules. That is the fair, practical, and promising way forward, and that’s what I’m committed to passing as President of the United States. (Applause.)
We must never forget that time and again, the promise of America has been renewed by immigrants who make their story part of the American story. We see it in every state of our country. We see it in our families and in our neighborhoods. As President, I’ve been honored to see it demonstrated by the men and women who wear the uniform of the United States.
Last month, I had the honor of welcoming a group of our service members as citizens for the very first time. In that crowd, there were faces from every corner of the world. And one man from Nicaragua — Jeonathan Zapata — had waited his whole life to serve our country even though he was not yet a citizen. “By serving in the military,” he said, “I can also give back to the United States.” He’s done so in Afghanistan, and he even helped man the 400,000th aircraft landing aboard the USS Kitty Hawk.
And Jeonathan’s story is not unique either. He’s part of a proud legacy of service. For generations, Hispanic Americans have served with great commitment and valor, and there are now nearly 150,000 Hispanic Americans serving under our flag. And today we are proud — (applause) — today we are proud to welcome several of them who are wounded warriors recovering at Walter Reed. Please join me in honoring their service, and in keeping them and all of our troops in our thoughts and prayers — please. (Applause.)
These troops have dedicated their lives to serving their fellow Americans. Their example — like those of all of our men and women in uniform — should challenge us to ask what we can do to better serve our communities and our country, because the greatest responsibility that we have as citizens is to one another.
That’s the spirit we need to build; that’s the America that we seek. And to do so, we must look past our divisions to serve the hopes and dreams that we hold in common. We must give life to that fundamental belief that I am my brother’s keeper, that I am my sister’s keeper.
Scripture tells us, “The word is very near to you. It is in your mouth and in your heart so you may obey it.” Today, let us pray for the strength to find the word in our hearts, and for the vision to see the America that we can build together as one nation, and as one people.
Thank you for your partnership. Thank you for your prayers. May God bless all of you, and may God bless the United States of America. (Applause.)

——————–

June 19, 2009

Gibbs: Not enough votes in Congress for immigration reform

@ 3:06 pm by Michael O’Brien
The votes aren’t there for the Obama administration to achieve its desired immigration reform, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said Friday.
“We know the votes aren’t there right now,” Gibbs said during his daily press briefing about the congressional appetite for a comprehensive immigration reform package that would give illegal residents in the U.S. a path to citizenship.
“I think there’s a seriousness in an effort, but in understanding that in 2005 and 2006 and even in 2007 there was not a majority yet to do this,” Gibbs said, referencing the Bush administrations failed effort to rope in enough Republicans and centrist Democrats to pass immigration reform and a guest worker program.
The plan was derailed when conservative activists, who claimed the program would have constituted “amnesty” for illegal immigrants, managed to pick off enough Republicans in the House and Senate to forestall a vote.
Gibbs said that the White House would make an effort, though, to win the votes for a reform plan, for which President Obama reiterated his support Friday morning.
“We want to work with those both in favor and support of those previous efforts to see where we can get comprehensive immigration reform to pass,” Gibbs said.

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